Sunday, August 6, 2017

Running Target

The nice thing about rifle night, at least from the activity director (big title for the guy who sets it up), is you do things you’re interested in.  Sometimes it doesn’t have to involve rifles.

At our last rifle night we started by timing in with our pistols at about 5 yards.  Of the six participants, only a few could draw an unconcealed weapon and hit the target center of mass with one round under 2 seconds.  We cycled through the drill a few times and most of us got it under 2 seconds.

We'll shoot these with both pistol and rifle to time in.
We use paper plates as replaceable centers,


We backed up another 5 yards for a total of 10 yards, slung our ARs and repeated the drill.  While we fired three rounds, I was only interested in the time to first round.  To my surprise, despite holding the weapon in the low ready it took most people almost the same time to bring the rifle up and fire as drawing the sidearm and fireing. 

I had them back-up as I thought it would be too easy at 5 yards, just point and pull. 

I made a few observations on timing in:
Several people, drew their pistol and then repositioned their bodies or moved their feet.  This always took extra time.  Learn to shoot with your feet where they are.

Some had trouble with their operating controls.  That includes safeties and sights.  One shooter using a dot sight on his pistol showed improved time simply by switching to iron sights.  He is still in the learning curve of finding the reflex sight’s dot.  A dot sight could be the answer to several age related problems.  There are several ways to shoot a dot sight, including using the entire sight as a giant ghost ring.

Many of us shoot several guns.  Why?  Because we can, but we don’t get the benefit of shooting the same gun over and over again.  Speaking for myself, I suspect we’re having trouble with our sights.  This can be cause by several factors.  We may not be able to see them sharply.  We aren’t bringing up the gun with the front sight visible in the rear, or we’re trying to get the front sight level, even and perfectly symmetrical in the rear sight.  A perfect sight picture will never happen outside of a ransom rest.

Dry firing and practice drawing will help that with all of these.

One of the best local shooters has natural talent.  He really shoots better than any of the other local shooters.  He doesn’t practice, he’s that good.  Watching him you realize he makes no unnecessary motion.  His draw doesn’t look that fast, but his time is.  Again, it’s because he doesn’t waste time with unnecessary motion.  I suspect he has a well developed sense of proprioception, but in any case reducing unnecessary motion will improve your time.


I expected rifle time to be faster since the gun was already out and in your hands, so I was a little surprised it took about the same time.  I suspect since the rifle was heavier than a pistol, with different balance and requires two hands so it took longer to mount the rifle and crack off a round.  The rifle bridges hands, shoulder, eye and target so it may actually be more complicated than shooting a handgun.  Here too, practice would improve performance.

We also ran a reverse Tueller drill.  What’s a Tueller Drill?  The short answer is it demonstrates how fast a person can close on you while you are drawing your sidearm.  You can read more at:

This time we placed the ‘armed’ humanoid target at 21 feet and attacked them with a target on a mover.  It’s a simple system, you pull a rope as fast as you can, the shooter tries to get at least one round off before they are run over by the oncoming target.  By placing the puller behind the shooter, the movement is surprise.

An easy to make mover, the wheels are the most expensive part

The rules were simple.  When the mover starts, you react.  Even with piece of paper on a wood frame, many shooters found it intimidating.  Most of us instinctively moved sideways from the moving target.

We discovered most of us were point shooting as the target was on top of us by the time we fired.   Weapon retention was called for, not sight picture.

Even practicing it several times didn’t drastically change the outcome. 

Because of the layout of the tracks of the mover, all the shooters moved to their left so any misses and shoot throughs hit the ground to the shooters right.  Not only do you need to look at what’s the backstop behind the shooter, but to the left and right. 

We repeated the experiment with the rifles. We moved the shooters back to about 36 feet and discovered the same thing.  It takes longer for a person with a rifle to raise the rifle from the low ready and discharge one round.  Assuming that at least one of the 8 or 9 people shooting was a competent rifleman, this is astonishing.

The drill indicates you can run over 10 yards ( a football first down!) and stab a rifle man before he can get his rifle up and discharge one round.  That’s true for 7 yards with a pistol in a holster.  This implies you need more reactive gap with a rifle than a pistol!


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